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How to use your network to survive a bad job market


During an international pandemic and economic recession, it is a historically bad time to find a job. Hungry job searchers need to get creative.


Nevertheless, this can be a great time to find the job you didn’t expect. Many companies are reinventing their businesses and expanding the skill sets they’re looking for. An important component of job search success is the strength of your network. You won’t read advice about getting hired that doesn’t include networking, but you may not know if you need to cast your net widely. Typically, new jobs don’t come from your primary network (those who know you best and with whom you speak most often), since you and they probably have similar knowledge of the opportunities available. New opportunities normally emerge from your secondary and tertiary networks because those are the contacts who have access to markets and people you don’t. By definition, they will know of possibilities that are new to you.

So, to find success in your job search, stay connected with those who are close to you, but reach out to those who are more distant.

GO BROAD The creation of new links is key to building your network. Tap into these secondary or tertiary networks by asking to get introduced on LinkedIn or by reaching out to people you know from a distance but with whom you don’t normally interact. Perhaps there is a college friend you haven’t seen in years, but with whom you can rekindle a connection. Or maybe there’s someone you met in a previous role who can be helpful to you.

While it may be tough to put yourself out there, it will be to your advantage to be open about seeking work. Resist the advice to keep your old title on your LinkedIn profile until you find something new (instead, be clear in your moniker you’re on the hunt). In addition, consider reaching out to a wide breadth of contacts, casting a wide net, letting them know you are open for new opportunities, and asking them to keep you in the loop if they hear of anything fitting. Read More

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